Saturday, July 4, 2015

Happy 4th of July!

 
Happy 4th of July!

Friday, July 3, 2015

U. S. Flag Etiquette


Flag Etiquette

We’re your one-stop shop for all things flag-related. From flag etiquette and history to a large stock of "Old Glory" itself available at the VFW Store. Look no further for all things red, white and blue!
The federal flag code says the universal custom is to display the U.S. flag from sunrise to sunset on buildings and stationary flagstaffs in the open, but when a patriotic effect is desired the flag may be displayed 24-hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness. Also, the U.S. flag should not be displayed when the weather is inclement, except when an all-weather flag is displayed.

Displaying the Flag:

On Same Staff
U.S. flag at peak, above any other flag.

Grouped
U.S. flag goes to its own right. Flags of other nations are flown at same height.

Marching
U.S. flag to marchers right (observer's left).

On Speaker's Platform
When displayed with a speaker's platform, it must be above and behind the speaker. If mounted on a staff it is on the speaker's right.

Decoration
Never use the flag for decoration. Use bunting with the blue on top, then white, then red.

Salute
All persons present in uniform should render the military salute. Members of the armed forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute. All other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, or if applicable, remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart.

Over a Street Union (stars) face north or east depending on the direction of the street.

Half Staff
On special days, the flag may be flown at half-staff. On Memorial Day it is flown at half-staff until noon and then raised.
Do not let the flag touch the ground.
Do not fly flag upside down unless there is an emergency.
Do not carry the flag flat, or carry things in it.
Do not use the flag as clothing.
Do not store the flag where it can get dirty.
Do not use it as a cover.
Do not fasten it or tie it back. Always allow it to fall free.
Do not draw on, or otherwise mark the flag.

Flag Disposal:

1. The flag should be folded in its customary manner.
2. It is important that the fire be fairly large and of sufficient intensity to ensure complete burning of the flag.
3. Place the flag on the fire.
4. The individual(s) can come to attention, salute the flag, recite the Pledge of Allegiance and have a brief period of silent reflection.
5. After the flag is completely consumed, the fire should then be safely extinguished and the ashes buried.
6. Please make sure you are conforming to local/state fire codes or ordinances.
Note: Please contact your local VFW Post if you'd like assistance or more information on proper flag disposal

Thursday, July 2, 2015

July 4th Schedule

The administrative offices of the Coastal Environmental Partnership will be closed Friday, July 3rd.

The Tuscarora Landfill, Grantsboro Transfer Station and Newport Transfer Station will follow their regular schedules.

Have a safe and happy Holiday!  

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

State debuts mobile-friendly interactive public beach and waterfront access map

State debuts mobile-friendly interactive public beach and waterfront access map


RALEIGH – Looking for a spot to access one of North Carolina’s beaches or coastal waterfronts during the Fourth of July holiday weekend?
Now you can access the state Division of Coastal Management’s interactive public beach and waterfront access map directly from your mobile device.
Developed by division staff, the new mobile version of the agency’s popular online access site map provides information for more than 400 access sites along the North Carolina coast. The interactive map includes the location of each site, a site photo, number of parking spots and any applicable parking fees, restroom and shower facilities, and other amenities.
To view the new mobile beach access map, visit http://arcg.is/1GI1Nib or scan the map’s QR code:

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

State Butterfly

NCpedia
          

Butterfly

Eastern tiger swallowtail

by Michelle Czaikowski Underhill
NC Government & Heritage Library, 2012.
Photograph of the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly, from <i>Extension Gardener</i>, NC Cooperative Extension Service, 2009.  Presented on NC Digital Collections. Photograph of the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly, from Extension Gardener, NC Cooperative Extension Service, 2009. Presented on NC Digital Collections. The North Carolina General Assembly designated the Eastern tiger swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) as the official State butterfly of the State of North Carolina. The bill was ratified on June 11, 2012 and approved on June 15, 2012.
The Eastern tiger swallowtail is native to North America and is generally considered the first North American butterfly to have been drawn. The first drawing of it was by John White. White was an artist, cartographer, and is also known as the governor of the Roanoke Island colony that came to be known as the "Lost Colony."
About twenty-five other states either have official state butterflies or have butterflies as their official state insect. Delaware, Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia all either have the Eastern tiger swallowtail as their official state butterfly or as their official state insect.

 
John White's early depiction of the male Eastern tiger swallowtailWhite, John. 1585-1593. Tiger swallowtail butterfly. British Museum.Additional resources:
Bowen, Liessa Thomas and Chris Moorman. 2002. Butterflies in your backyard: urban wildlife. North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service, North Carolina State University. Online at http://www.ncsu.edu/goingnative/ag636_02.pdf
North Carolina General Assembly. 2012. "An act adopting the Eastern tiger swallowtail as the official State butterfly, designating the Shelby Livermush Festival as the official fall livermush festival of the State of North Carolina, designating the Marion Livermush Festival as the official spring livermush festival of the State of North Carolina, and designating the Swansboro Mullet Festival as the official mullet festival of North Carolina." Session Law 2012-29. Online at http://ncleg.net/EnactedLegislation/SessionLaws/HTML/2011-2012/SL2012-29.html
Wildlife Junior Journal, New Hampshire Public Television: http://www.nhptv.org/wild/karnereasterntigerswallowtail.asp
Dodge, Greg. 2010. "Tiger swallowtails and others." NC Museum of Life & Science blogs. http://blogs.ncmls.org/greg-dodge/2010/08/04/tiger-swallowtails-and-others/
Image credits:
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service. Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly. Photograph. Extension Gardener. 2009. Extension Gardener</i>, NC Cooperative Extension Servicehttp://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p249901coll22/id/428850, 2009.  Presented on NC Digital Collections. http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p249901coll22/id/428850 (accessed December 17, 2014).
White, John. 1585-1593. Tiger swallowtail butterfly. British Museum. Online at http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectid=753484&partid=1. Accessed 6/22/2012.
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